sculpture

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Since I’ve photographed Washington DC so much, I sometimes play tricks on myself and try to park my car in different places so I can find different perspectives in photographing the landmarks. That way I will force me to walk different directions than I’m used to and hopefully see things differently. I think this trick works well, as long as you remember where you parked your car 🙂

So I was driving around, trying to look for a different parking spot when I noticed the Bartholdi Fountain flowing with water at sunrise. I was surprised it was on because even the World War II memorial on the National Mall doesn’t start the water until 6 am. So when I drove past around 5:30 am, I was excited and knew that I wanted to photograph the fountain.

It’s been a while since I have photographed it. Almost 4 years! But I do remember thinking that I wanted to get back there one day for sunrise. So I finally did it and concentrated on creating layers with the US Capitol dome. The sunrise itself didn’t have any clouds in the sky so I really wanted to fill the frame with the dome, water, and fountain. I made sure to have a “slower” shutter speed so you can see the steam of water flowing well against the almost white sky.

My camera settings for this image is F20 at 1/15th sec and ISO 400 with my Sony A7II and 70-200mm.

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Last week I had the honor of visiting the National Gallery of Art for the new Vermeer and the Masters of Genre Painting: Inspiration and Rivalry exhibit. It’s a temporary exhibit but so amazing. I loved how the artists in the exhibit would portray depictions of daily life. Seemly ordinary tasks made beautiful. For example, there were multiple interpretations of a woman writing a letter but the way that these artists would light the subject or even use background imagery as important elements of art was fascinating. I took my time to study each and every single one.

My favorite piece was probably the one entitled “Astronomer by Candlelight” by Gerrit Dou. The piece itself is super tiny. I don’t have them exact measurements but it can’t be any larger than a 5×7″ picture frame. What I liked the most about it were all the details that Dou was able to fit onto this small canvas. I love the lighting and the intricate lines in the map. I found myself staring at the astronomer’s face for over 2 minutes. Everything just looked so polished and very calculated. The arched frame was very unique as well. Overall, I think this piece would look nice in my living room 🙂 Just sayin’!

But there is so much more to see!

So if you have free time in the DC area, go to the National Gallery of Art. It’s a free exhibit and you’ll fall in love. My image is the entrance to the Vermeer and the Masters of Genre Painting exhibit. Can you just imagine what’s inside?

The camera settings for this image is F4.5 at 1/25th of a second ISO 400 with my SonyA7II and 16-35mm wide angle lens.

Thanks again to the National Gallery of Art for the invite. I had a great time at the exhibit!

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About two weeks ago, I visited Glenstone Museum again. My second time visiting but just as great as the first. This time however, I was really hoping to see Split Rocker in full bloom, which he was and it made me so happy. I circled him about 3 times while smiling before we had to go on with the tour. It’s crazy to see such a huge statute full of flowers. Props to Jeff Koons.

But I think my unexpected favorite was the Richard Serra piece called Sylvester. From the outside, it doesn’t look like much, but as you circle to the inside, you get all these amazing variations of sunlight and shadows. Also the way that the piece divides the sky is very cool too. I bet it’d look amazing during a really puffy, cloudy day or even a nice sunrise/sunset.

And it’s actually much bigger than you think it is but doesn’t take much effort to walk through, if that makes sense? Once you’re totally inside, the acoustics in the center are totally amazing. You can totally feel your voice echo inside you. Kinda surreal. But I can also see how it’d be distracting if you were trying to hold a real conversation.

So walking out, I noticed this form. Again it was the shadows and the lines that really drew me into this scene. The sun flare from the lens was an added bonus that adds a little bit more interest into this piece. I don’t know, abstracts like this isn’t something I usually photograph or post. What do you think of it?

If you ever want to have a unique museum experience, make sure to book a tour at Glenstone. It’s privately owned so you have to have a reservation but it’s completely free. Totally worth it, especially if it’s a really nice day and you can enjoy the outdoor sculptures.

My settings for this image was F/9 at 1/160th of a second at ISO 200.

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If you’re in the DC area, check out the June’s issue of the Washingtonian magazine. Its the best of Washington issue and I have two pictures in there! So freakin’ cool! The first and biggest one is the one featured above. I took it one morning at the Hirshhorn Museum when people were waiting in line for the Yayoi Kusama: Infinity Mirrors exhibit on one of the last days that it was here. They were waiting for day of passes but it’s crazy because I took this around 7a in the morning and there were already so many people there. The light was absolutely amazing and the reflection in the middle as so cool. It was hard not to take the picture. The Washingtonian contacted me and said they were doing a story on lines in DC so I thought that this one would fit perfectly. I especially like all the blue and yellow tones plus the reflection in the windows are pretty awesome as well.

The second image I have in this month’s issue is of the National Gallery of Art’s new roof terrace sculpture by Katharina Fritsch’s titled “Hanh/Cock”. I originally wanted to take a picture of it for Chinese New Year since this year is the sign of the Cock. I think it’s really cool that it ended up in the Washingtonian. This sculpture itself is pretty large and in charge when you see it in person. I don’t know if you can see, but theres a slight shadow of someone in the window. That might give you a comparison of what it’s like to stand right next to it. Oh the jokes that this bird has heard.

Anyways, shout out to Washingtonian for being so awesome. Its always so exciting to see my work published in print. I grew up on the Washingtonian so I’m grateful to be able to contribute to such an awesome publication.

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This past Wednesday I had the amazing opportunity to visit the Roni Horn exhibit at the Glenstone Museum in Potomac, Maryland. First of all, this space is amazing. I had no idea that such a modern museum was located in MD. As soon as I drove on to the property, I was super impressed.

The best part of the whole experience was touring the Horn exhibit. First of all, Emily Wei Rales, Director and Chief Curator of Glenstone led the tour which was so thought-provoking and interesting. I felt like I could listen to her talk all day. She explained how Horn’s art explores the idea of a person’s identity, differences between pairs and the use of words, colors and phrases to create art while being influenced by places such as Iceland. This immediately resonated with me since I just got back from Iceland and I’m already ready to go back.

The biggest take away I got from the exhibit is to be mindful and stay true to who you are as a person (whoever that may be). I really got inspired to learn more about myself, how I’m perceived by other people and to learn more about how other artists view the world. I just bought this book. Let me know if you read it. I’m really interested in reading more about current artists and how they think.  So if  you’re in the area and you’ve never been to Glenstone, it comes with my highest recommendation. I’ve already booked another ticket to go back in a couple of weeks.

You know what’s funny? If you asked me a couple of years ago, I would of never called myself an artist. I was never comfortable with the label even though I loved taking pictures. I just saw myself as someone who loved photography but as I grow and learn more, I’m beginning to feel comfortable with the identity and it feels good <3

roni horn, american artist, photographer, painter, sculpture, glenstone museum, potomac, maryland, gallery, exhibition, exhibit, emily wei rales, director, chief curator, thought-provoking, interesting, iceland, identity, self awareness, mindful, inspired, book, art, artist, photography

Here’s a photo my friend, Jenn (Instagram: jennrightmeow) took of me while in Glenstone museum. I was learning so much that I felt like I had to sit down and get it all down on my phone before I forgot.

awakening, national harbor, maryland, sunset, landscape, sculpture, angela b. pan, abpan, hdr

The first time I’ve been to this sculpture was when it was still in DC. I still remember trying to clear off the leaves off it’s face so I could get a clear shot. I’m really glad it has moved to the National Harbor. It just makes it so much more accessible and family friendly.

Check out my vlog from this shoot

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